That Voodoo That You Do

The sun is out despite the weather forecast for thunder. We are in the garden, it’s all happening out here. Glenn is slashing and hacking and taming the beast that once was an unruly jasmine and is now an enlarged deck, a spot for some more plants and a much better feel to the whole plot. I, on the other hand have been tormenting the bottom bed. I’ve moved the chives which were being swamped by the sage. I’ve moved the polemonium which was being swamped by the persicaria. I’ve moved the stinging nettles which were swamping everything in their path and I’ve ruthlessly pulled up handfuls of three brilliant plants. Here they are;

Firstly the euphorbia, it will not quit. It started out as three small seedlings which Sarah Raven gave us. I used it as a foundation to my wedding bouquet and it has been in nearly every flower arrangement we have had in the house for the past three years. You can chop bits off it an it doesn’t seem to mind and it carries on through the winter. Its’ brilliant green is endlessly cheerful and sings out against the dark background of the neighbouring trees in summer. What they tell you about the sap is true. Always wear gloves, always wash your hands. If you get some on your skin and then put your contact lenses in it feels as if your eyeballs are being peeled by elves from hell with burning fingers….trust me.

Next is lamium. We bought ten plants three years ago for 50p each as we needed ground cover. We got it. It took a while to get going but it has totally covered everything we wanted it to and has spread throughout the woodland area at the bottom of the garden. This spring it had a fantastic show of yellow flowers and continues to encroach at a sensible pace. The best thing about it is, again, you can pull bits off and it won’t mind one bit. Just now I have reclaimed the steps and fill the compost bin.

Lastly, the no idea plant. We had a tiny bit growing in the original rockery which was here when we moved in. We saved a little bit as it has tiny pretty purple flowers. Underneath the current carpet of craziness there is stepping stone path and a dry stone wall but you wouldn’t know it. The beauty of this thing is that you can rip it up from wherever you don’t want it and it carries on, doesn’t even care.

Are you sensing a pattern here? I love this kind of gardening!

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Getting Better All The Time

We’ve been busy, again. Somehow the urge to blog has dwindled but with spring now in full flow the sap is rising both literally and naturally. WoodBlocX contacted us in January to ask if they could interview us for their blog…..read the full story here https://www.woodblocx.co.uk/blog/itv-woodblocx-garden-makeover/

This coincided with a repeat of Big Dreams Small Spaces series two. It was funny to see us building the garden all over again and reminded us how hard we had worked. I have changed jobs since the first showing and so my new colleagues all thought Glenn and I had been secretly working with Monty Don without telling them. They were all equally puzzled that we had got married without telling anyone! They were quite disappointed to discover that it had all taken place three (yes really) years ago.

Perhaps the biggest surprise came late last month when I had a text early one morning from my sister to say did I know we were on Netflix. Probably the most impressive bit of coverage ever. So now we can retire into our garden, happy in the knowledge that we have shared our story with the world several times over.

As I write this from our new conservatory (oooh, I’ve got something else to blog about now), the rain is tipping down onto the garden. Everything is coming up again and some things are already very different from last year. It likes to keep us on our toes. This year’s biggest change is that the 60 tulip bulbs I planted have all disappeared. There are some rather chubby squirrels about though…

Rambling

November and the sun is shining. Well, to be fair this photo was taken at the weekend so it was technically October but what does a few days matter. One week off work yielded much activity but almost none of it was spent in the garden. We have had the builders round laying the base for a much awaited conservatory so that has dominated our outside time. As you can see the garden has been left to do its thing which I think is to be encouraged. Too much time is spent fussing and worrying plants. Sometimes you just have to let things go for it in their own space and time.

We were given a small cutting of Salvia Hot Lips two years ago when our garden was new. Today it is almost triffid like, not yielding to any amount of pruning, defying us with utterly vigorous regrowth, flowering furiously all year. It has overshadowed the Alchemilla Mollis and the dainty Geum. I have hacked it back three times and this has only encouraged it to grow more bullishly. I intend to be savage once it has finished flowering and have taken some cuttings just in case I finish it off.

The cosmos are raging still and I am cutting four vases of flowers each week. Not bad for a small garden. We haven’t planted any new bulbs this year so it will be interesting to see what comes up in a few month’s time. I am hoping for a field of black and pink tulips but fear squirrel action.

 A couple of weeks ago I picked all the crab apples from the little tree my mother gave me several years ago. I have managed to make one jar of jelly from it each year but this year I have four jars, a bumper crop. There are still some on the tree I didn’t pick them because at the time I was doing battle with a few garden spiders so rather than risk being covered in arachnids, I let the last few fruits stay where they were…for the birds….I tell myself.


April Fools

So here we are on the first of April and it’s a weekend and we are both at home. Somehow does not seemed to have happened for along time and if you also throw in some fiendishly good weather you have everything for a great start to the day. People have been asking us how our garden is a lot recently. Our stock answer for the past couple of months has been that it isn’t doing much and there isn’t a lot to see. However, a couple of hours out there today has proved us both wrong. There is a lot happening.

At first glance there is a lot of bare soil but the tulips have popped up, albeit very sparsely. I seem to remember planting hundreds and hundreds of bulbs. Gradually everything is coming back, the geraniums, the verbena, alliums, reum, gaura, geum all making their way back into our lives. In addition the roses are in glossy leaf and the wallflowers Glenn grew from seed are so bushy and perfumed you never would have thought it possible. I am heartened that a few things I thought were dead are showing me they most certainly are not. We gave everything a mulch last month which has helped to keep things looking neat and cushioned against a cold night. The woodland area at the bottom of the garden still needs work and despite lots of primroses, anemones, hellebores, primulas and snowdrops, there is still space for them all to stretch out and be wild.


Our favourite spot, the boat seat, is back in action too now that it’s warm enough to be able to sit outside and have a cup of tea and stare at the world. The plum tree has more blossom on it than last year but it’s growing in a really bad place, right in the shadow of the sycamore and will never give us the glut of fruit we want. Right now it’s smothered which is promising but we both know it’s all for show.
So we are back in the swing of it, weeding, seed sowing, moving things, planning things, cutting things but mostly sitting and looking at it which was the plan all a long really. And all the while in the back of our minds is…….the allotment.

Relax

image.jpgRelax

I completely love umbellifers. They draw me in. Every shape and size is of equal appeal. I sketch them, photograph them, paint them, collect their seed. Seeing them in drifts like this makes me stop and sigh. It’s like lacey fairy snow on a summer’s day. They are so dainty and detailed and yet so robust and virulent. I should really know more about this group of plants but all I do know is that they are the parsley family and some have edible roots, like carrots. I also know that if you cut them to bring inside for a huge blousey display, they drop their petals within minutes and smell like cat’s wee. So perhaps it’s best to allow them to roam free.

Just near our home is a large expanse of wild ground. In summer it is drenched in this stuff and you can wade through it waist high. If that isn’t relaxing I don’t know what is.